TECHNOLOGY

AI Lawyer Takes on Speeding Tickets in Court: How DoNotPay’s Robot Lawyer Works

In recent years, artificial intelligence (AI) has made strides in various fields such as translation, art, and even essay writing. Now, it’s ready to argue in court. Start-up DoNotPay, which bills itself as the “world’s first robot lawyer,” is planning to take on two speeding ticket cases in court next month with its AI instructing defendants on how to respond to their assigned judges.

How Does DoNotPay Work?

DoNotPay’s plan is to have the defendants wear an earpiece with Bluetooth connectivity in the courtroom, likely an AirPod or hearing device, with the AI whispering instructions on what to say in the defendants’ ears. One defendant will argue their case in person, the other on Zoom. The company is also considering taking on a third case over an eviction.

This will be the first time AI is used in court, according to DoNotPay CEO Joshua Browder. The company is keeping the exact dates and locations of the hearings under wraps in case state bars try to intervene. Browder hopes the experiment loosens courtroom rules against the use of AI in court, which he believes hurts low-income individuals since roughly 80% cannot afford legal assistance, according to the American Bar Association.

What is DoNotPay?

DoNotPay, which has been operating since 2015, has released templates that help people appeal parking tickets or request refunds from airlines. It has also created a bot that can negotiate bills with companies like Comcast using GPT, or Generative Pretrained Transformer technology from OpenAI.

Risks of AI Lawyers

Browder acknowledges that there are risks to being the first to rely on AI in court, but DoNotPay has agreed to cover any fines and the defendants will be compensated for taking part in the experiment. The company has also taken steps to avoid issues with its AI exaggerating facts or being “too polite” and responding to everything the judge says – including rhetorical statements.

While the AI’s initial court cases are set for February, there may be more to come. Browder said on Twitter that DoNotPay would pay anyone with an upcoming case in the U.S. Supreme Court $1 million to wear AirPods and let its robot lawyer argue the case.

DoNotPay’s AI lawyer will be the first of its kind to take on speeding tickets in court next month. The defendants will wear earpieces with Bluetooth connectivity in the courtroom, and the AI will whisper instructions on what to say in the defendants’ ears. This is a significant step in the field of AI and legal assistance, and it will be interesting to see how this experiment turns out and how it will shape the future of AI in the legal field.

It remains to be seen if the use of AI in court will be widely accepted and adopted, but DoNotPay’s experiment is certainly a step in that direction. By using AI to assist with legal cases, more people, especially those from low-income backgrounds, will have access to legal assistance. This can help level the playing field in the legal system, making it more fair for all.

However, there are also concerns about the use of AI in the legal system. There is a risk that AI-assisted legal representation may not be held to the same ethical standards as human lawyers. Additionally, there may be issues with AI not fully understanding the nuances of the law and human emotions, which can have a significant impact on a case.

Despite these concerns, the potential benefits of AI in the legal system are undeniable. By using AI to assist with legal cases, more people will have access to legal assistance, and the legal system can become more fair and efficient.

In short, DoNotPay’s AI lawyer is set to take on two speeding ticket cases in court next month, with its AI instructing defendants on how to respond to their assigned judges. This is the first time AI is being used in court, and it will be interesting to see how this experiment turns out and how it will shape the future of AI in the legal field. While there are concerns about the use of AI in the legal system, the potential benefits are undeniable, and it will be interesting to see how technology continues to shape the legal system in the future.

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